Egyptian Scribes

Alright so I’m a writer. My dream is to write, sell books, maybe run some workshops, and some mentoring. I need constant reminders that anything else is a hobby or an interest or a challenge I’d like to face and not my calling.

So I was thinking and visualizing myself in the future. I was thinking about who I am and who I want to be, I saw myself writing at a table surrounded by huge scrolls. Huge. Like from the ceiling to the floor. When I saw this image, I felt peace, solitude, and familiarity. I find our minds fascinating and I was inspired to see myself writing while also slightly disappointed by not being surrounded by piles of money.

But it got me thinking about how writers were treated much differently in ancient Egypt. They were called scribes back then and did hieroglyphs. So of course I had to do some looking into the scribe life. Here’s a few tidbits I found on Historytoday.com:

“The text known as the Satire of the Trades dates to the Middle Kingdom, the Golden Age of Egyptian literature, between 2025 and 1700 BC. It belongs to a genre known as ‘Wisdom Texts’, supposed collections of the experiences of learned and influential men to be shared with following generations as advice on behaviour, deportment and career advancement. In the Ramesside era (1300-1075 BC), the Satire of the Trades was one of the texts most frequently copied by student scribes. It compares a scribe’s work with that of other trades and crafts in an attempt to persuade the student that education will make him better off than anyone else. The introduction, supposedly written by a father for his son, reads:  

I have seen many beatings – set your heart on books! I have watched those conscripted for labour – there is nothing better than books! It [scribedom] is the greatest of all callings, there is none like it in all the land.

https://www.historytoday.com/miscellanies/scribe-egyptian

There’s more. But I’ve lost track of time so I’ll have to continue this post for tomorrow.

Stay tuned more on Egyptian Scribes to come.

Published by Jayne

Jayne is a writer. On her free time she likes to be with her family hiking outdoors and traveling. New England is her home and place of birth. When asked what she wants to teach the world she replied, "Don't stop searching. Too many times, in my old life, I put my search aside for more 'important matters.' I didn't realize the thing I was searching for held what was most important; my soul purpose." Jayne works daily improving her craft and at times can get down on herself, but her favorite morning mantra is "It's a new day." and that's what she strives to start with.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: