Paul Gauguin On Solitude

 

463px-Paul_Gauguin_-_Self-Portrait_with_Halo_and_Snake
Paul Gauguin Self-Portrait with Halo 1889 oil on panel National Gallery of Art

Paul Gauguin was a painter who was praised as the leader of the symbolist artists in 1891. This style of painting was inspired by the symbolist writers of the time. In a letter to symbolist poet, critic, and editor of litarary journals Charles Morice, Gauguin says,

…[ There are] two kinds of beauty: one that results from instinct and another which would come from studying. The combination of the two, with its necessary modifications, produces certainly a great and very complicated richness, which the art critic must devote himself to discover….

Art has just gone through a long period of aberration caused by physics, chemistry, mechanics and the study of nature. Artists having lost all their savagery, having lost no more instincts, one could even say imagination, went astray on every path, looking for productive elements which they did not have enough strength to create. Consequently, they act only as a disorderly crowd, they feel frightened like lost ones when they are alone. That is why solitude must not be advised for everyone, since one must have strength to be able to bear it and act alone.

There’s a lot more in this letter than Gauguin’s thoughts on solitude. An artist must learn to art alone. It is in solitude where thoughts come and go freely without the harsh priority of daily chores. When an artist learns to be alone, they gain control of their environment. Like baby turtles they must learn to get from the nest to the ocean without getting lost or snatched up on the way. This requires some instinct and once alone, it requires study. There is an art in arting alone. There is a space where artists must meet themselves and say ok we’re in this together and I’m not leaving you here to drown. It does take a faith in yourself and a great faith in your art.

According to  Gauguin thought of himself as “a savage beyond the taint of civilization.” He escaped European civilization and fled to Polynesia where he spent his life painting. All while being pressured by his family to return to business. He painted alone so alone in fact that he did not even have the support of his own wife and family Until. The. Day. He. Died.

He’s right when he says solitude requires strength. I do, however, believe that solitude should be for everyone.

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Symbols- revisited

She asks for symbols

while I doodle

stars and hearts in blue ink

across the top of a blank page

 

Maybe I don’t get it, Professor

Maybe I never will

 

I’m on to circles and squares

Images of old Egyptian

pillars appear

containing hieroglyphs

with no meaning

 

Evoke the imagination

She voices

before putting her head

back down

 

Semi circles and unfinished squares

dotted like a Morse code

have been placed

with no meaning

Dotted with intent

but no definition

What is this place where

I feel the depth

of each

meaningless symbol?

 

-Saschia

Symbols

 

She asks for symbols

while doodling stars and hearts

in blue ink

across the top of a blank page

Maybe I don’t get it, Professor

Maybe I never will

She’s on to circles and squares

then sees images of old Egyptian pillars

And creates her own hieroglyphs

with no meaning

(to her)

“To evoke the imagination.”

She voices before putting her head back down

Simi circles and unfinished squares

That are dotted like a morse code

But they have been placed

With no meaning

Dotted with intent

But no definition

Somehow she still feels the depth

Of each meaningless symbol 

 

-Saschia Johnson

 

 

 

Yesterday I blogged about Jan Van Eyck

Portrait_of_a_Man_by_Jan_van_Eyck-small