For the Conscious Writer

A Collection of Thoughts for Writers on a Journey

This will be a collection of lessons I’ve learned on the way. They were initially written for my past self but I need to hear them now too. The point of these writings are for encouragement and guidance to those who write for the purpose of internal growth and understanding with the intention of unconditional love.

Image for post
Photo by dan wilding on Unsplash

As Conscious writers we intentionally feel everything in a world where feelings are considered inappropriate. This act isn’t sunshine and cupcakes, but as conscious writers we know that taking the time to feel is better than the numbness that comes from flight. We dig. We listen. We rise.

We know that we may seem different and soft in a world where normal and tough is what’s expected. We aren’t your typical writer, and yet in so many ways we are just the same. There’s a place for us on this journey where our differences are exactly what we need to finish our story. We grow to accept that we won’t always be accepted.

Acceptance looks like a passive state, but in reality it brings something entirely new into this world. That peace, a subtle energy vibration, is consciousness.

Eckhart Tolle

We are shunned from certain circles when we question authority. It’s not always the authority figure that shuns us. Often times, the authority figure is excited to finally have someone aware enough to engage. It’s usually others in the group that shun the question asker, as if questioning behavior is uncouth. We question anyways, with or without fear because we need those answers to write the truth in our stories. We peek our nose where it doesn’t belong and question the things everyone else is too busy or too ashamed to question. We are the curious cats stubborn against conformity.

The worst curse to befall anyone is stagnation, a banal existence, the quiet desperation that comes out of a need for conformity.
— 
Deepak Chopra

We are taught to keep our heads down and be like everybody else, but that’s where conscious writers are different. We write to capture all of ourselves. All the intricacies and inner workings. We will watch this story unfold with our head up and our eyes wide open until the very end.

Image for post
Photo by James Wheeler on Unsplash

We are on a journey and our writing is proof we’re still alive. In poetic terms, each page is an exhale.

Read more from For The Conscious Writer here

Have a Go To Beverage

For the Conscious Writer

Image for post
Photo by 五玄土 ORIENTO on Unsplash

Rituals, anthropologists will tell us, are about transformation. The rituals we use for marriage, baptism or inaugurating a president are as elaborate as they are because we associate the ritual with a major life passage, the crossing of a critical threshold, or in other words, with transformation.

Abraham Verghese

As a conscious writer, you’ve dedicated yourself to the art of writing. You’re going to be doing this writing thing everyday for a long time, might as well make it into an enjoyable ritual. Have a drink you can enjoy every writing session. I have a cup of tea and a treat for my writing sessions. (The ones I’m mostly awake for anyway.)

For me, having a simple routine makes the transition into intentional writing run more smoothly. As a mom, I’m usually juggling 5 things at once, even when I’m sitting on my phone. My book, my social media, what I’m going to feed myself, and have I cleaned enough all alert me on top of meeting my kids needs. To turn the multi tasking off, I drink a cup of tea and enjoy something sweet.

On another note, your mouth doesn’t move while you write words, so you should have a beverage close by so you can get a break from clenching your jaw. (Ah, here’s a reminder, you can unclench your jaw now).

Image for post
Photo by Artem Labunsky on Unsplash

Make it your thing. Have a thing that’s simple and that’s yours. It doesn’t have to be different from other humans. Most writers hail a strong cup of coffee. If that’s your thing, let it be your thing. Embrace your thing. -Saschia Johnson

Then write your heart out because we’re waiting to hear from you.

Click Here to Read My Piece titled “A Conscious Writer, Is a Valuable Writer.

On Art and its Purpose

On Art and its Purpose

Image for post

Photo by gustavo centurion on Unsplash

I used to be offended when people misunderstood my work, then I came to realize that the evolution of thought is what art is all about. Not that it’s about being misunderstood but it’s about setting the idea free and allowing it to be whatever it becomes. It’s not always easy to allow your work to be its own thing separate from you as the creator.

The principles of true art is not to portray, but to evoke. — Jerzy Kosinski

When we set out to create something, we must trust that when it’s time, a message will be revealed. We must also be understanding that it won’t be in the same way that we, as the artist, received it, because the artist didn’t have her own art yet to give herself that message. So as the art is sent out into the world, it’s going to give its message in a different way than the artist received it.

The true use of art is, first, to cultivate the artist’s own spiritual nature.— George Inness

What’s great about being an artist is that our art not only evolves and changes when we set it free but we also evolve and change every time we set our work free. The process of creating changes us in million different ways. The way we see our own struggles gaze at us, the way we fill gaps and solve problems, and the way we attempt to give our ideas digestible context. These few things requ

Read More…

View at Medium.com

The Whole Artist

Can’t be seen in one piece of art

Image for post

Photo by  on 

When you look at an artist’s work, you can’t look at one piece and know the whole artist. One piece of work is just a bleep on the radar. Especially in today’s world. You can’t just look at one post, or one blog, or one short story, poem, whatever. You have to follow the artist. Follow them with the intent to understand where their work is coming from and for the most dedicated followers, where it is going. How is it evolving? How is the artist evolving?

We don’t know Leonardo da Vinci from just the Mona Lisa. We know him for his writing, his contraptions, his relationships with other artist and intellectuals of his time. We appreciate da Vinci for who he was entirely. Would he be so well admired if we didn’t know about him outside of his paintings?

All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

The point here is, show yourself. Show who your are outside of your art. You are not one painting, you’re an entire collection. You are more than one work of art. You’re a gallery. You are Picasso’s works before, during, and after his Blue period. That’s about……….

View at Medium.com

How to Perceive the Muse

View at Medium.com

Here’s Your Freedom

“The man who has no imagination has no wings.” ―Muhammad Ali

“Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire…

View at Medium.com

Art or Die

Creating art keeps me from suffering an internal death. If I was to stop creating, for me that would be a spiritual suicide. So when I say die, as in “Art or die,” it’s a metaphorical death. When I don’t write, I get all groggy and lack interest in being alive alive. My brain starts to fall into a sort of sleep state. This is why I make sure I write everyday.

I feel like I can handle when things go wrong much better when I write daily. I’m not sure why this is. Maybe it’s because I’m more conscious of myself. I do know, writing everyday makes my life better. Makes me better and more aware of the choices I’m making throughout the day.

Writing has a dark….

View at Medium.com

“Art In My World”

Art is an exchange of ideas.

Something I love about art is that its message can evolve and grow as the art is passed down from the creator. When I first began to write, I used to be offended when people misunderstood my work. Then, I came to realize that the evolution of thought is what art is all about. Not that it’s about being misunderstood but it’s about setting the idea free and allowing it to be whatever it becomes. It’s not always easy to allow your work to be its own thing separate from you as the creator.

“The principles of true art is not to portray, but to evoke.”— Jerzy Kosinski

When we set out to create something, we must trust that when it’s time, a message will be revealed. We must also be understanding that it won’t be in the same way that we, as the artist, received it, because…

Read “Art In My World” by Saschia J https://link.medium.com/S5KuDGFA18

Trust Your Art

As artists, it’s important to value the process but it’s trusting in your art that helps deliver it to world. When I find myself doubting my art, it’s brings me down. I get writers block. I can get overly frustrated while I’m creating so I can’t get it finished. And that’s when creating isn’t fun for me anymore. So, we need to trust our art because it helps us to be confident in what we’re creating. And we need to create because art makes the world go round. So here’s seven ways to trust your art so the world can keep on spinning.

Know your purpose

Once you know why you’re arting, it makes it easier to stay committed to your work. It gives your work a rich touch that’s unique to you. Use your purpose, goals, and values as beacons to get you through the rough patches. There’s a million reasons to quit but you only need one to keep going. Discipline is great. Motivation is great. Determination is great. But none of those things are going to push you through your doubts, your blocks, and whatever else the universe throws at you. Find your purpose and let it destroy all the parts of you that want to quit.

Understand that you’re contribution is valuable

What you have to share is irreplaceable. We are still discovering artists from centuries ago. Just because no one appreciates your work now, doesn’t mean it’s useless. Also you never know who you are inspiring by putting your art out there.

Read More On Medium

Paul Gauguin On Solitude

 

463px-Paul_Gauguin_-_Self-Portrait_with_Halo_and_Snake
Paul Gauguin Self-Portrait with Halo 1889 oil on panel National Gallery of Art

Paul Gauguin was a painter who was praised as the leader of the symbolist artists in 1891. This style of painting was inspired by the symbolist writers of the time. In a letter to symbolist poet, critic, and editor of litarary journals Charles Morice, Gauguin says,

…[ There are] two kinds of beauty: one that results from instinct and another which would come from studying. The combination of the two, with its necessary modifications, produces certainly a great and very complicated richness, which the art critic must devote himself to discover….

Art has just gone through a long period of aberration caused by physics, chemistry, mechanics and the study of nature. Artists having lost all their savagery, having lost no more instincts, one could even say imagination, went astray on every path, looking for productive elements which they did not have enough strength to create. Consequently, they act only as a disorderly crowd, they feel frightened like lost ones when they are alone. That is why solitude must not be advised for everyone, since one must have strength to be able to bear it and act alone.

There’s a lot more in this letter than Gauguin’s thoughts on solitude. An artist must learn to art alone. It is in solitude where thoughts come and go freely without the harsh priority of daily chores. When an artist learns to be alone, they gain control of their environment. Like baby turtles they must learn to get from the nest to the ocean without getting lost or snatched up on the way. This requires some instinct and once alone, it requires study. There is an art in arting alone. There is a space where artists must meet themselves and say ok we’re in this together and I’m not leaving you here to drown. It does take a faith in yourself and a great faith in your art.

According to  Gauguin thought of himself as “a savage beyond the taint of civilization.” He escaped European civilization and fled to Polynesia where he spent his life painting. All while being pressured by his family to return to business. He painted alone so alone in fact that he did not even have the support of his own wife and family Until. The. Day. He. Died.

He’s right when he says solitude requires strength. I do, however, believe that solitude should be for everyone.

Follow me on Medium