Her

She loves the sunsets

Something she told me today

The colors she mentioned

Were red white and blue

I said it reminded me of orange creamsicle

She mentioned ice cream

Which makes perfect sense

Then we turned the corner

And she said just one more time

“I think sunsets are beautiful

This is one of many reasons why

I love her.

-Saschia

Read more at Jayne.press

Will Write For Tomorrow

Light in the distance

A globe or maybe an orb

It flits around the corners of my heart

Dashes against the edges of my mind

I look and touch and smell

What it may be like

I want things a way

Smooth oiled machines

But life isn’t so oiled

It’s jagged and rough

There are times when moments

Connect seamlessly and those I pocket

And dissect later

But mostly it takes work

and prayer

and sweat

-Saschia

Bubble Bath

Bubble Bathsoap-bubble-1983918_1280

The tub is full and the bubbles bobble on top

My legs have adjusted

but when the rest of me sinks in

it burns.

In the tub, I’m a lost soul

venturing from the heavens to a five star hotel

It is there I’m considered a holy whore with no divine gifts

My words

they float in front of me popping the suds

And here I soak

without a clue and nothing to give

Here I sink

soggy as a sponge in the pits of the ocean

 

-Saschia Johnson

 

Photography- Morality Project

Goth Tessa Dana Chris

Photography/Editing: James Futrell

Hair: Melissa Payne

Makeup/Creative Director: Saschia Johnson

Models: Tessa Dipallina and Christine Talamayan

 

.

Wanna read more? Here’s another great piece from our Morality Collection by Geoff Blanchette

 

Love Song

 

wolf-2043464_1280

I admire his persistence

and oh, how his howling soothes

like the thumping inside her womb

those vibrating drums birthed from her mouth

I admire his persistence

how her beats stretch across his howl

The night twinkles

bare, bare, bare, with dull blood

Dance in her womb, crawl on your knees, eyes shut

A mighty hand guides you to the unknown

 

-Saschia Johnson

 

African Influence on Modern Art

For today’s post I wanted to talk about African influence on modern art. I was wondering at first why there isn’t more diversity in Symbolic art. I found that there is diversity and I wanted to make sure to share it. I planned this post last week and I’ve been eager to share it all week. According to The Met, “During the early 1900s, the aesthetics of traditional African sculpture became a powerful influence among European artists who formed an avant-garde in the development of modern art.”  Painters including Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, blended the post-impressionist works of Cezanne and Ganguin with the “highly stylized treatment of the human figure in African sculptures.” The combination of the two resulted in pictorial flatness, vivid color palette, and fragmented Cubist shapes which helped define early modernism. What I find most fascinating is that “the artists knew nothing of the original meaning and function of the West and Central African sculptures they encountered, [but] they instantly recognized the spiritual aspect of the composition and adapted these qualities to their own efforts to move beyond the naturalism that had defined Western art since the Renaissance.”

There may be some out there that say these artists stole ideas from African sculptures. I think it’s important to keep in mind that in the art world it’s a complement to influence other artists. I borrow many things from other writers when creating new stories and poems, but most of my work is influenced by creators that have the biggest impact on me. When you are an innovator or creator that is what moves things forward in ways that are needed in order for an artist or even a society to grow. Henry James says ” Art lives in curiosity, exchange of views, variety of attempt, experiment, and comparison of standpoints.” Without the strong influence of these African sculptures, early modern art would not be the same or could not have happened at all.

Brooklyn_Museum_2002.31.3_Fragment_of_a_Female_Figure
Fragment of a female figure from Wikipedia

 

 

Where I found the info:

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/aima/hd_aima.htm