We are Agents of Beginnings

For the conscious writer

Image for post
Image by klimkin from Pixabay

“We are agents of beginnings.” –Art as Existence by Gabriele Guercio.

When I first started writing, I wanted to hide behind my creations. I wanted to be an anonymous figure that created something powerful. For me, there was a sense of humility in creating a profound piece of art while living in secret without all the reviews and rewards. Living a private life, hidden from the world is something I do treasure. So this seemed like a marvelous path. But there’s a problem with this mindset. First, let’s talk about our new beginnings.

“Who am I?”

One of the most important questions we can ask ourselves as artists. This really is the bedrock of our creations. This is where writing is transformed from mimicry to individual and original works. Okay, now that we’ve clarified our foundation, let’s keep moving forward. What accompanies our who?

With our “who” we are led to our why? Like, why are we writing? Then we are led to our what? What are we doing about our why and our who? For clarity, this might be what your why looks like:
I am the representation of a strong woman who perseveres as a writer to show others the gifts and tools writing can provide.

Ok, let’s just say you know your why, how are you acting on that? Not in your art, in your life. What are you actively doing to pass on this mindset? So what I’m saying is, you are what you do. Not what you’ve done but what you do presently. The monotony, the unexpected, the things you say yes to are all who you are. This isn’t to create a sense of unforgiveness or shame but to bring awareness to your actions as a conscious writer.

I am [insert your action] because [insert why].

When you begin to explore your who, the goal is, or should be, to become aware of both your internal and your external until you overcome the gap. Freud would say making the unconscious conscious. Whatever you label it, this exploration has no end. Closing the gap between the two isn’t to reach a fixed state. It should be understood as a constant “production of presence.” According to Gabriele Guercio in Art as Existence; Hanna Arendt, a twentieth-century great thinker, argues,

for a view of the the human condition in which everyone’s insertion in the world must be understood as a ‘second birth,’ singularity revealed via praxis. This birth ‘is not the beginning of something but of somebody, who is a beginner himself.’ It occurs when one stops belonging merely to a natural species and asserts one’s own initiative.

Image for post
Photo by Amit Gaur on Unsplash

We are a species of new beginnings. The initial “insertion into the world” (what Arendt would like us to call second-birth,) is what some call self-actualization. Part of the second birth is accepting that we aren’t a fixed state. Which means your “who” and your “what” can evolve and change as the gap between the two closes. And as it closes you become fully embodied in your who. What a beautiful thing it can be to become an unpredictable and unique individual. Someone with their own initiative who doesn’t just go with the flow of things.

This is why my mindset shifted from hiding behind my art. I realized that my becoming is part of my novel writing. This becoming and unbecoming is what is going to make my art art. I show up with my flaws, and my mistakes, and my manic days, and my downward spirals because my awareness of all these details is going to close the gap. It’s going to insert my humanity into the world with all my “beginner” showing. It is now my intention to allow my life to compliment my art. I want to mirror something other than the outside world, I want to mirror myself.

Image for post
Photo by Jian Xhin on Unsplash

The quotes in this article were taken from Art as Existence by Gabriele Guercio.

For the Conscious Writer

A Collection of Thoughts for Writers on a Journey

This will be a collection of lessons I’ve learned on the way. They were initially written for my past self but I need to hear them now too. The point of these writings are for encouragement and guidance to those who write for the purpose of internal growth and understanding with the intention of unconditional love.

Image for post
Photo by dan wilding on Unsplash

As Conscious writers we intentionally feel everything in a world where feelings are considered inappropriate. This act isn’t sunshine and cupcakes, but as conscious writers we know that taking the time to feel is better than the numbness that comes from flight. We dig. We listen. We rise.

We know that we may seem different and soft in a world where normal and tough is what’s expected. We aren’t your typical writer, and yet in so many ways we are just the same. There’s a place for us on this journey where our differences are exactly what we need to finish our story. We grow to accept that we won’t always be accepted.

Acceptance looks like a passive state, but in reality it brings something entirely new into this world. That peace, a subtle energy vibration, is consciousness.

Eckhart Tolle

We are shunned from certain circles when we question authority. It’s not always the authority figure that shuns us. Often times, the authority figure is excited to finally have someone aware enough to engage. It’s usually others in the group that shun the question asker, as if questioning behavior is uncouth. We question anyways, with or without fear because we need those answers to write the truth in our stories. We peek our nose where it doesn’t belong and question the things everyone else is too busy or too ashamed to question. We are the curious cats stubborn against conformity.

The worst curse to befall anyone is stagnation, a banal existence, the quiet desperation that comes out of a need for conformity.
— 
Deepak Chopra

We are taught to keep our heads down and be like everybody else, but that’s where conscious writers are different. We write to capture all of ourselves. All the intricacies and inner workings. We will watch this story unfold with our head up and our eyes wide open until the very end.

Image for post
Photo by James Wheeler on Unsplash

We are on a journey and our writing is proof we’re still alive. In poetic terms, each page is an exhale.

Read more from For The Conscious Writer here

How to Write Like an Artist

Feel more connected to your work

Image for post

Photo by Alice Donovan Rouse on Unsplash

This is just a fun title. There’s no rules to being an artist. That’s what makes artists artists. Anyway, here’s some things to consider, while you’re writing, that will make you feel more connected to your work as if it is a work of art.

Self Reflect

This is the cardinal rule. “Know thyself.” Self reflection helps you to be more understanding of other’s who are in similar situations. Self reflection is the entire point of artistry. Don’t get me wrong, people who don’t self reflect can sell great art because art sales is a business. But creating art, that’s not just business, that is creating and business. It’s both, it’s so much more than sales. Creating something timeless requires some understanding of our internal workings. Know yourself, know your art. They go hand in hand.

Know when to fuck what they say

With my first novel being experimental fiction, I’m all for bending the rules. I love movies that don’t follow standards. I love writers that don’t either. But there’s an art to it. Some things are worth listening to, especially if they are in line with your values. But experiment, try new things, listen sometimes, tell them to fuck off other times. There’s no real balance, we’re all learning here.

Image for post

Photo by Cristian Newman on Unsplash

Meditate

Meditation calms my nerves and lets me see where my writing can take me. It refreshes my imagination and gives me peace and stability in myself. There’s something about meditation that beings me back to myself in the midst of chaos. It helps me focus on the right thing, my art.

Have a go to beverage

Red Bull, Tea, Coffee, Water, it has to be one of these. Your mouth doesn’t move while you write words, so you should have a beverage to give you a break from clenching your jaw. Ah, here’s a reminder, you can unclench your jaw now.

Resolve your biases

Any unresolved biases will come out in your writing. It might be in a subtle way like where you put characters in the workplace, or nicknames, or the way a character speaks. Resolved biases give us the chance to be honest with ourselves and our reader. This creates a strong connection. Works of art that connect with viewers in this way, draws them away from all the madness. We all could use those moments.

Journal

Journaling is an artistic thing. It keeps us connected to our work, it helps us flesh out problems, create new ideas, and let’s us know where our thoughts have left off. It helps with resolving biases, meditation, self reflection, and learning to know when to bend the rules. Trust me, journaling is worth it.

Write poetry (terrible or not)

Poetry is like cleaning the filter of your vacuum cleaner. It lets out the symbols, the rhythms, the metaphors and (un)conscious thoughts.

Make a fool of yourself

The best way to be an artist is to be afraid of making a fool of yourself and doing it anyway. It’s showing courage for the work you’ve put in. Get out there and bare it all. That act alone is considered foolish these days. Be yourself. Be so unapologetically you, that you get the taste of freedom just at the tip of your tongue.

Chances are, if you made it this far, you’re already a writer. You show commitment reading this entire article that doesn’t matter much anyway.

View at Medium.com

What Made Me A Writer

I was not always a writer.

I grew up in a single parent home with a mom battling depression. She, with the help of my family, made sure we had everything we needed while prioritizing a deep rooted relationship with Christ. I was blessed with a father who loved me and did the best he could to raise us from outside of our home, while focusing on his own ambitions. As a child, this was confusing and sometimes hard but, as an adult, I completely understand where he was in life. I had an amazing brother who toughened me up and taught me how to be a good loser. He always expected better and praised me when I did improve. He didn’t let boys treat me bad and this over time, supplied me self-worth. As for school, I grew up failing most of my classes and hating school. I felt excluded in private high school and cried every day in public school. I was mostly invisible to teachers except for my loving step mother who worked hard to get me into school every day. She was my outward motivation but I had no intrinsic motivation to go to school. In my mind I was stupid, ugly, fat, and weird. It was a very uncomfortable place in life for me. I felt stuck, dropped out, and attended adult education.

I had already loved psychology at this point and spent most of my free time trying to learn about schizophrenia. I realized I loved this subject, everything about it. After learning everything I could independently about schizophrenia, I moved on to learning about multiple personality disorder and depression. (This is when nobody used the internet, I was taking books out at the library.) Then someone told me about a place that was hiring. It was a private school for children who were mentally handicap. (The title “mentally handicap” was politically correct back then, now I would carefully say, special needs.) The timing and type of job was perfect for me. I loved it, everything about it. Though, there was still a part of me that didn’t feel good enough or smart enough and kinda weird. Those feelings did not stop me from doing my job but it did stop me from moving up in the chain of command. After 11 years, I eventually got to a point in my career where I was given responsibility over one child. While being responsible for that student we started off our days with violent tantrums showing very little interest in being independent, to eventually independently leading me. This took a lot of time, goal setting, blood, sweat, and most of all patience. Some may be bothered when their “student” leads them but, for me, this was an emotional tear worthy moment. That student started as a child with no motivation, like myself and grew into a women who was more motivated than the motivator. The job was a success and I was satisfied. After success, coincidentally I had also become a mother and my job was changing management, which meant I had to learn a whole new person’s vision and after 11 years of trying to learn another person’s vision, I was done. The job was out grown and it was time for me to grow like my student, who is now my motivator. I was off to college.

At this day in age it seems as if college is glorified more than the career itself. While college is at your fingertips, jobs are nearly impossible to find. Not all jobs, just the jobs that fit your passions. It is scary for myself, as a college student, to think about what will come of all my college debt. That doesn’t stop me, this unstoppableness may be a form of ignorance or false security but it still doesn’t stop me. The award winning neurosurgeon, Ben Carson said, “When you educate a man, you liberate a man,”(or women of course.) So, here I am being liberated and I am confident that the debt I am gaining will someday be worth it.

With all that, work for your passions and don’t stop! Persevere. It took 11 years for me to get to this point. It took Charles Hull 30 years to create the 3D printer and he can’t stop there. We can’t stop here. While your reaching for your goals, in the words of the Great Dylan Thomas, “…” To close I must say loudly, Don’t be a lady about fighting for your passions.

View at Medium.com

A Woman

Take away the dishes

The wife-ing

The mothering

And you’re left with

A writer

An artist

!A REVOLUTIONARY

Who dreams of sowing thought

respect

And empathy back into our existence

She grasps for words

And stories

She grasps for experiences

She fails

She falls she rises

Over and over again

She is a woman

She is an entire future stitched together with all the labels she’s out grown

-Saschia